dislike


dislike
dislike n Dislike, distaste, aversion, disfavor mean the state of mind of one who is not drawn to or turns from or avoids a person or thing; often these terms imply the manifestation of the state of mind.
Dislike normally suggests the finding of something unpleasant or repugnant or of a kind one is unwilling to meet or to face
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an aristocratic disdain and dislike of the bourgeoisie— Inge

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differentiating between mere aversion and dislike and morbid unreasonable fear or dread— Armstrongy

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In itself dislike is rather neutral but it is readily intensified by context to the point of suggesting complete detestation
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I was on fire with the same anger, dislike, and contempt that burned in Hobart towards me— Rose Macaulay

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Distaste, which implies a lack of taste for, usually stresses a squeamishness or a repugnance but allows a good deal of range in intensity to this squeamishness or repugnance; it may imply such other feelings as fear occasioned by the difficulties involved
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a pronounced distaste for mathematics

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or rebellion at constraint or confinement
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for sheer pity of the repressed . . . distaste on Nettie's face, you . . . drove her down to the movies— Mary A us tin

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or simply an unexplained reluctance
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great as was his need of shelter, the Bishop . . . was struck by a reluctance, an extreme distaste for the place— Cather

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Aversion suggests a disinclination for someone or something which manifests itself especially in attempts to avoid, evade, or escape. An aversion may be temperamental or it may be the result of training; it may or may not suggest an accompanying feeling, but it consistently implies a definite reaction on the part of one manifesting it
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he tried to take hold of her feet with his hands, but she shrank from him with aversionHudson

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unless we can give them an aversion from cruelty, they will not abstain from it— Russell

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the natural human aversion to cold, noise, vibration, . . . and the unfriendly and lonesome environment at high altitude— Armstrong

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Disfavor, the weakest of these words, usually suggests no more than a lack of liking or approval but it may imply contempt, lack of confidence, or disdain as motives
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the proposal met with general disfavor

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the young prince had fallen into open disfavor at court

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Punch . . . eyed the house with disfavorKiplingy

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Analogous words: hate, hatred, detestation (see under HATE vb): disapproval, deprecation (see corresponding verbs at DISAPPROVE)
Antonyms: liking
Contrasted words: affection, *attachment, love: *predilection, partiality

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • dislike — dis*like , n. 1. A feeling of positive and usually permanent aversion to something unpleasant, uncongenial, or offensive; disapprobation; repugnance; displeasure; disfavor; the opposite of liking or fondness. [1913 Webster] God s grace . . .… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • dislike — verb. The normal construction is with an object, which can be a noun (We dislike modern art) or a verbal noun (They dislike being absent). It is non standard to follow dislike with a to infinitive, although this is sometimes found: • ☒ She was… …   Modern English usage

  • Dislike — Dis*like , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Disliked}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Disliking}.] 1. To regard with dislike or aversion; to disapprove; to disrelish. [1913 Webster] Every nation dislikes an impost. Johnson. [1913 Webster] 2. To awaken dislike in; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • dislike — [n] antagonism, hatred toward something animosity, animus, antipathy, aversion, deprecation, detestation, disapprobation, disapproval, disesteem, disfavor, disgust, disinclination, displeasure, dissatisfaction, distaste, enmity, hostility,… …   New thesaurus

  • dislike — ► VERB ▪ feel distaste for or hostility towards. ► NOUN 1) a feeling of dislike. 2) a thing that is disliked. DERIVATIVES dislikable (also dislikeable) adjective …   English terms dictionary

  • dislike — I noun abhorrence, abomination, animosity, animus, antagonism, antipathy, aversion, contempt, detestation, disaffection, disapprobation, disapproval, discomfort, disdain, disfavor, disgust, disinclination, disparagement, displeasure,… …   Law dictionary

  • dislike — (v.) 1540s (implied in disliking), hybrid which ousted native mislike as the opposite of LIKE (Cf. like). Related: Disliked; disliking. English in 16c. also had the excellent dislove hate, cease to love, but it did not survive …   Etymology dictionary

  • dislike — [dis līk′] vt. disliked, disliking to have a feeling of not liking; feel aversion to; have objections to n. 1. a feeling of not liking; distaste; aversion; antipathy 2. something disliked dislikable adj. dislikeable …   English World dictionary

  • dislike — {{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}} noun 1 feeling of not liking sb/sth ADJECTIVE ▪ deep, extreme, great, intense, real, strong, violent, visceral ▪ Several …   Collocations dictionary

  • Dislike — (Roget s Thesaurus) < N PARAG:Dislike >N GRP: N 1 Sgm: N 1 dislike dislike distaste disrelish disinclination displacency GRP: N 2 Sgm: N 2 reluctance reluctance Sgm: N 2 backwardness backwardness &c.(unwillingness) 603 …   English dictionary for students


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